Saturday, March 12, 2011

Untitled Artworks
(Exhibition - ArtCloth: Engaging New Visions)

Tjariya (Nungalka) Stanley and Tjunkaya Tapaya
Ernabella Arts (Australia)

Preamble
This blog spot is a great supporter of Aboriginal ArtCloth and prints on paper since it is simply great! The posts below are in this genre.
ArtCloth from Tiwi Islands
Aboriginal Batik from Central Australia
ArtCloth from Utopia
ArtCloth from the Women of Ernabella
ArtCloth from Kaltjiti
Australian Aboriginal Silk Paintings
Contemporary Aboriginal Prints on Paper
Batiks from Kintore
Batiks from Warlpiri
Aboriginal Batiks from Northern Queensland
ArtWorks from Remote Aboriginal Communities
Urban Aboriginal ArtCloths


This blogspot also contains many posts of artworks that have featured in a number of exhibitions that have been curated by me or by other people. For your convenience I have listed these posts below.
ArtCloth: Engaging New Visions. M-T. Wisniowski
Sequestration of CO2(Engaging New Visions) M-T. Wisniowski
Sacred Planet I (Engaging New Visions) J. Dunnewold
Under Pressure (Engaging New Visions) L.A. Beehler
lo Rising II & Giza (Engaging New Visions) R. Benson
Etruscan Relic (Engaging New Vision) J. Raffer Beck
Catch The Light 1 & 2 (Engaging New Visions) J. Schulze
Emerge (Engaging New Visions) J. Truckenbrod
Breathe Deeply (Engaging New Visions) C. Benn
Die Gedanken Sind Frei 3 & 4 (Engaging New Visions) C. Helmer
Black Birds I & II (Engaging New Visions) C. Holmes
Autumn Visions I & II (Engaging New Visions) J. Petruskeviciene
Razing/Raising Walls, Warsaw (Engaging New Visions) N. Starszakowna
Quite Alone Oasis… (Engaging New Visions) J. Urbiene
Nothing Is The Same I & II (Engaging New Visions) E. van Baarle
Discharge Thundercloud (Engaging New Visions) K. Kagajo
Shroud Of Ancient Echoes I & II (Engaging New Visions) S. Fell-McLean
Cane Toad Narrative (Engaging New Visions) H. Lancaster
Visionary and Eclipse (Engaging New Vision) J. Ryder
Treescape (Engaging New Vision) A. Trevillian
Codes – Lost Voices (ArtCloth Installation) M-T. Wisniowski
Unleashed: The Rise of Australian Street Art (Art Exhibition) Various Artists
Merge and Flow (SDA Members Exhibition) M-T. Wisniowski
Confluence (SDA Conference) Various Artists
Transformation (Fairfield Museum and Art Gallery) Various Artists
The Journey (Megalo Studio) M-T. Wisniowski
Another Brick (Post Graffiti ArtCloth Installation) M-T. Wisniowski
Six Memos (Shepparton Art Gallery) S. Fell-MacLean
Venice Biennale (Art Exhibition) Various Artists
When Rainforests Ruled (Purple Noon Art & Sculpture Gallery) M-T. Wisniowski
Floating (Purple Noon Art & Sculpture Gallery) H. Lancaster
When Rainforests Glowed (Eden Gardens Gallery) M-T. Wisniowski
My Southern Land (Galerie 't Haentje te Paart, Netherlands) M-T. Wisniowski
The Last Exhibition @ Galerie ’t Haentje the Paart
Paste Modernism 4
El Anatsui
Mark Making on Urban Walls – Post Graffiti Art Work
Memory Cloth - Rememberings in Textile Make Lace Not War - Part I
Fleeting

Introduction
The Australian contribution to - ArtCloth: Engaging New Visions – will be on the blogspot for the next two weeks, thereby completing the contributions to this exhibition.

The catalog of the exhibition is far more detailed in terms of opening addresses and artist’s biographies, curriculum vitae and statements etc. and moreover, is a holistic record of the exhibition itself.

Website: Ernabella


Synopsis of Artwork: Tjariya (Nungalka) Stanley,Untitled
Tjariya (Nungalka) Stanley was taught batik in the 1970’s when artists Nyukana (Daisy) Baker, Jillian Davey and Angkaliya Purampi (deceased) came back from a workshop in Indonesia and taught other Ernabella women the batik process.

“They showed us how to use a tjanting and put the wax on”, she said. When describing this piece and the colours, Tjariya uses the Pitjantjatjara word “inuntji”, which means fresh plant growth, especially blossom. These colors can be seen as wildflowers in spring around the Musgrave Ranges. The long shapes represent “karu” (creeks) that flowed with water for the first time in many years last December. The rounded half moon shapes are “puli” (rocks) - another characteristic feature of the landscape of her country.


Techniques
Silk Batik.
Size: 110 (width) x 270 cm (length).


Synopsis of Artwork: Tjunkaya Tapaya, Untitled
Tjunkaya Tapaya has been doing batik since the 1970’s when artists Nyukana (Daisy) Baker, Jillian Davey and Angkaliya Purampi (deceased) came back from a workshop in Indonesia and taught other Ernabella women the batik process.

Tjunkaya often draws on the environment of her country in her batik work. This piece incorporates plant iconography such as “tjanpi” (grass), “kampurarpa” (bush tomatoes), “kaliny-kalinypa” (honey grevillea) and other “putipulawa” (wildflowers). The colors she has used in this piece reflect the color of the country around Ernabella after the big summer rains, when green and yellow grasses and new growth of trees and shrubs cover the landscape.


Techniques
Silk Batik.
Size: 110 (width) x 280 cm (length).

(a) Untitled by Tjunkaya Tapaya on left, Untitled by Tjariya (Nungalka) Stanley on right.
Fairfield City Museum and Gallery, NSW, Australia.
Photograph courtesy Cedric Boudjema, Director, Fairfield City Museum and Gallery.

(b) Untitled by Tjunkaya Tapaya on left, Untitled by Tjariya (Nungalka) Stanley second from left.
Orange Regional Art Gallery, NSW, Australia.
Photograph courtesy Alan Sisley, Director, Orange Regional Art Gallery.

(c) Untitled by Tjariya (Nungalka) Stanley on left; Untitled by Tjunkaya Tapaya second from left.
Redcliffe City Art Gallery, Queensland, Australia.
Photograph courtesy Karen Tyler, Director, Redcliffe City Art Gallery.
Photography by Al Sim.

(d) Untitled by Tjariya (Nungalka) Stanley on left; Untitled by Tjunkaya Tapaya on right.
Wangaratta Art Gallery, Victoria, Australia.
Photograph courtesy Marie-Therese Wisniowski.

(e) Untitled by Tjariya (Nungalka) Stanley - full view.

(f) Untitled by Tjariya (Nungalka) Stanley - detailed view.

(g) Untitled by Tjunkaya Tapaya - full view.

(h) Untitled by Tjunkaya Tapaya - detailed view.

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