Saturday, November 26, 2011

Veiled Curtains
Fine-Art Prints Series (Silkscreen)

Marie-Therese Wisniowski

Preamble
This blogspot is not only devoted to ArtCloth and all things fabric (e.g. wearables) but also to limited edition prints on paper and artists' printmakers books. I have listed below for your convenience my contribution to this artistic genre.

Made to Order
Unique State (Partners in Print)
Wangi's Djiran:"Unique State" Prints
A Letter to a Friend
Beyond the Fear of Freedom
Travelling Solander Project
Star Series
Imprint
Cry for the Wilderness
Federation on Hold - Call Waiting
Wish You Were Where?
The Four Seasons


Introduction
I have always combined my passions. My prints on cloth techniques inform my prints on paper techniques and vice versa (where such overlaps are possible). Hence I developed my Matrix Formatting and Low Relief Screen Printing (LRSP) techniques for prints on paper and then modified and transferred these technique for usage on cloth.

One of my other signature techniques for prints on paper I have termed "Multiplexing". It involves careful application of resists to numerous color plates, transparent color glazes, multiple layering of printed images and accurate registration. It is an extremely complex and time intensive technique, which works "best" on paper.


Veiled Curtains
Limited Edition Prints on Paper Series
Although the culture of the non-aligned countries is normally male dominated, the following women; Indira Ghandi, Aung San Suu Kyi and Benazir Bhutto, led their people in times of crisis. Each of these women were popular with their constituents. Each one of them was either assassinated or at one point in time, imprisoned. All had come from families, which had a rich political history and their families were revered. All gained early experience living amongst politicians and watching their fathers or husbands at work. They capitalized on their families popularity in order to reform their country, to better prepare the population for what they perceived would be the next stage in their nation’s development. Needless to say, the conservative forces within their nation attempted to modify or destroy their vision.

The series has been designed using the format of a stamp. Stamps depict the national identity of a country. Pictorial and commemorative issues usually depict historical figures or generalized subjects and seldom represent the specific contemporary themes that lend themselves to controversial political statements. Hence, this series highlights issues, through these women leaders, that their dynasties provided transitional leadership as their countries developed political systems - more often than not, to replace colonial rule. Yet while they have helped to build or restore democracy at some stage of their country’s history, they have subsequently failed to do much more. In the case of Aung San Suu Kyi, the struggle is still continuing; she is contesting the upcoming Myanmar by-elections.

The limited edition series is held at The University Of Newcastle Print Collection and in private collections. Veiled Curtains - Indira II is held in the following collections: Australian Print Council (Australia), London Print Studios (UK), Printmaking Collective Workshop, Chicago (USA), Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery (Australia).

Some editions are available for purchase. Each print in the series is 56 cm (width) x 76 cm (length).


Veiled Curtains: Indira


Indira Ghandi, (1917 - 1984), was Prime Minister of India (and the first woman Prime Minister of the largest democracy in the world), in 1966 - 77 and 1980 - 84. In 1964, the year of her father’s (Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru) death, Indira Ghandi was elected to Parliament where she held the position of Minister of Information and Broadcasting. Unable to agree on contenders for the position of Prime Minister, she was later picked as a compromise candidate. She held the office of Prime Minister from 1966 - 77. She was riding on the crest of popularity after India’s triumph in the 1971 war against Pakistan. The explosion of a nuclear device in 1974 helped to enhance her reputation among the middle-class as a tough and shrewd political leader.

In the second, post-emergency period of her Prime Ministership, Indira Ghandi was preoccupied by efforts to resolve the problems in the state of Punjab. In her attempt to crush the secessionist movement of Sikh militants, she ordered an assault upon the holiest Sikh shrine in Amritsar, the ‘Golden Temple’. It is because of this attack on the Temple that Sikh militants waged their campaign of terrorism against the government. In June 1984, the Golden Temple was stripped clean of Sikh terrorists. However, the Temple was damaged and Mrs Ghandi earned the undying hatred of Sikhs, who bitterly resented the desacralization of their sacred site. In November 1984, she was assassinated at her residence by two of her own Sikh bodyguards, who claimed to be avenging the insult she had heaped upon their nation.

Images in the print show Indira flanked by her spiritual mentor, Mahatma Ghandi, on the right, who was assassinated during his term in office and, on the left, her son, Rajiv Ghandi who, whilst on the 1991 campaign trail, was killed by a bomb blast. Mahatma Ghandi made himself the force of non violence whilst Rajiv’s period in office was marred by scandals and allegations of corruption. The trio are framed in a Hindu Temple entrance outline and the overall print/stamp is encased in a deconstructed Indian paisley border design.

The temple curtain in the background highlights iconic symbolism associated with Idira’s terms of office as Prime Minister. Guns depict her internal exploitation and use of the army to resolve internal disputes. The use of the army greatly increased during her time. A nuclear mushroom depicts her explosion of a nuclear device in 1974.

A section of the Sikh’s Golden Temple depicts her attempt to crush the secessionist movement of Sikh militants whilst destroying and desacrilizing their sacred site. The flower images depict her assination in the garden of her home by her two Sikh bodyguards.


Veiled Curtains: Suu Kyi


Aung San Suu Kyi (1945 - ) has become an international symbol of heroic and peaceful resistance against military rule. She advocates freedom and democracy for the country now called Myanmar, a name chosen by the present military dictatorship. For the Burmese people she represents their best and perhaps sole hope that one day there will be an end to the country’s military oppression. In 1991, while under house arrest, she was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for her efforts in trying to bring democracy to Burma.

For many of the years since she returned to Burma from overseas, she has been under house arrest in the capital, Rangoon. She was initially under house arrest for six years, until she was released on 10th July 1995. She was again put under house arrest in September 2000 when she tried to travel to the central northern city of Mandalay in defiance of travel restrictions. However on the 6th May 2002 she was released unconditionally following secretive talks with the military junta.

Images in the print show Suu Kyi with her father, the independence hero, General Bogyoke Aung San. He was assassinated during the transition period in July 1947, just six months before independence. Studying law at Rangoon University, he gave promise of a brilliant academic career winning prizes and scholarships. Political interests and activities as a nationally prominent student leader affected her father’s academic career. In 1938, he ended his law studies abruptly, in order to serve the cause of national freedom by joining the only militant and intensely political party in Burma, the Dohbama Asi-(anyone).

The two are framed in a Buddhist Temple outline and the overall print/stamp is encased in an architectural temple door border design. The temple curtain in the background highlights iconic symbolism associated with Suu Kyi’s struggle for her country.

The Bhudda image defines the fact that Suu Kyi is a Buddhist and that Buddhism is the predominant religion of Burma. Windows depict her detention and house arrest. The star and solitary bird depict the National League for Democracy Party, which she headed in 1990 and which won a landslide victory with 80% support. The letter “N” and the Bird of Peace represent the Nobel Peace Prize, which she was awarded in 1991. The Norwegian Nobel Committee wished to honour this woman for her unflagging efforts and to show its support for the many people throughout the world who are striving to attain democracy, human rights and ethnic conciliation by peaceful means. The “UN” image relates to the involvement of the United Nations. It was only in 2001 that the UN envoy, Razali Ismail, was able to reveal that talks had in fact been under way with the military junta. The UN had been pressing the government to make a number of key concessions. The main concession - Suu Kyi’s release - has now been met. The UN also wants freedom for political parties to operate, and moves towards power sharing.


Veiled Curtains: Benazir


Benazir Bhutto (1953 - 2007) was sworn in as Prime Minister of Pakistan on December 2, 1988, becoming the first woman to head the government of an Islamic State. Her objectives were to return Pakistan to civilian rule and to oust the men who executed her father. In 1990 President Ghulam Ishaq Khan dismissed her government for alleged corruption, but she ran on an anti-corruption campaign and was re-elected Prime Minister in 1993. In the preceding decade of political struggle, Benazir Bhutto was arrested on numerous occasions; in all she spent nearly six years either in prison or under detention whilst the leader of the opposition Pakistan Peoples Party. Throughout the years in opposition, she pledged to transform Pakistan society by focusing her attention on programs with respect to health, social welfare and education for the underprivileged. Her two terms in office had ended in allegations of corruption, which included $1.5 billion dollars in bribes.

Born in Karachi in 1953, she completed her early education in Pakistan and later attended Radcliffe College and Oxford University. As well as obtaining a degree in Philosophy, Politics and Economics, she also completed a course in International Law and Diplomacy at Oxford. In 1988 she received the Bruno Kreisky Award for Human Rights and in 1989 the Honorary Phi Beta Kappa Award from Radcliffe.

Images in the print show Benazir and her father, Zulfikar Ali Bhutto. He was one of Pakistan’s all-time popular leaders. Zulfikar seems to have favored Benazir over his two sons, suspecting that she was the most politically adept of them. He was hung in 1979 after a coup by General Zia, a Senior Army Chief.

The two are framed in an Islamic Temple outline and the overall print/stamp is encased in a representational star border design. The temple curtain in the background highlights iconic symbolism associated with Benazir’s terms of office as Prime Minister.

Guns depict assassinations, military coups, political turmoil and the crackdown she staged on armed rivals. The Rupee and Dollar signs are framed within a traditional Islamic mosaic pattern. They depict the corruption, mismanagement and poverty that surrounded her legacy in government. The hajib, depicts her as the first Islamic woman Prime Minister. The window framed with vertical lines depicts her detention, imprisonment and time in solitary confinement at Sakkur Jail. The Crescent and Star are the national symbols depicted on the Pakistan Flag and on the national currency.

The prints were developed using the same techniques in order to ensure that the series would be consistent. The prints are uniform in size, form and design structures. Using a mix of transparent, opaque and metallic inks, a consistent palette of deep, jewel like colors and contrast colors were printed for the series. Colors were mixed by hand using oil based screen printing inks. Each print required a new set of colors to be mixed that complied with the palette range. Each print incorporated the use of political and deconstructed historical images to substantiate the research in various forms as well as in text form.

The scale of various images and their positions on the page were also considered for uniformity. All prints employed extensive layering of images and colors. The primary focus of using transparent inks was to add layers of depth to the overall image thus seamlessly connecting the series.

As the series was screen printed, the photo stencil technique was the primary reproduction method employed for each print. Gum acacia and cold wax were overlaid on the stencil images using dry brush, wet brush and sponging methods. This enabled the extensive color layering of the images to be made and introduced areas of contrast.

Paper stock used for the print series was White Stonehenge. Cartridge and Stonehenge papers were used for initial experimental and proofing stages that this project required.

Saturday, November 19, 2011

Mintulee of Thurrabarree – The Last Rainmaker
ArtCloth

Marie-Therese Wisniowski

Introduction
I was invited to exhibit an ArtCloth work, “Mintulee of Thurrabarree - The Last Rainmaker” - by Helen Lancaster (curator) for her - A Conversation with Rain - exhibition which was held at the Fairfield City Museum and Gallery 23rd May – 5th July 2009.

Mintulee was known as Joe the Rainmaker. He became a Birdsville (Australia) resident in 1899 when he and the remnants of his Wangkangurru mob emerged from the southern Simpson Desert and made camp by the Diamantina River within sight of Birdsville.

Aboriginals believed that the Earth breathes and so issues steam that then produces clouds - which if coaxed - will condense to give rain. Joe the Rainmaker follows a long tradition of aboriginal elders who have the ability to coax rain.

The central image gives a mystical interpretation to Joe coaxing rain from the "Earth’s breadth". The artwork is a Shibori dyed whole cloth pattern with the central image being discharged and collaged on cotton. The image of the shibori dyed "cross" in the background signifies his poor treatment at the hands of his Christian protectors and also simulates the Earth "breathing", whilst the blue rain clouds are being coaxed over the land.


Mintulee of Thurrabarree - The Last Rainmaker

Full View - Mintulee.
Technique: Shibori dyed pattern and discharged on cotton.
Size: 105 cm (width) x 127 cm (length).

Detailed View 1.

Detailed View 2.

Detailed View 3.

Detailed View 4.

Saturday, November 12, 2011

Improvisational Screen Printing
Workshop

Tutor: Marie-Therese Wisniowski

Preamble
This blogspot exhibits many of my students outputs from a variety of workshops. There are one, two and five day workshops as well as workshops that have a different focus. Nevertheless, it always surprises me how much I learn from my students and how enthusiastic they are to learn and so for your convenience, I have listed the workshop posts below.

The University of Newcastle Multi-Media Course
The University of Newcastle (Newcastle and Ourimbah Campuses, NSW, Australia) 2008 to 2010.

One and Two Day Disperse Dye Workshops
Various Textile Groups (Australia) 2008 - 2011.

Five Day Workshop - In Pursuit of Complex Cloth
“Wrapt in Rocky” Textile Fibre Forum Conference (Rockhampton, Queensland, Australia) 29th June to 5th July 2008.

Five Day Workshop – In Pursuit of Complex Cloth
Orange Textile Fiber Forum (Orange, NSW, Australia) 19th to 25th April 2009.

5 Day Workshop – In Pursuit of Complex Cloth
Geelong Fiber Forum (Geelong, Victoria, Australia) 27th September to 3rd October 2009.

Two Day Workshop - Deconstructed and Polychromatic Screen Printing
Beautiful Silks (Melbourne, Victoria, Australia) 20th to 21st March 2010.

Five Day Workshop – Disperse Dye and Transfer Printing
“Wrapt in Rocky” Biennial Textile Forum/Conference Program (Rockhampton, Queensland, Australia) 25th June to 1st July 2010.

Two Day Workshop – Improvisational Screen Printing
ATASDA (Sydney, NSW, Australia) 28th to 29th August 2010.

Two Day Workshop – In Pursuit of Complex Cloth (Day One)
”Stitching and Beyond” Textile Group (Woodbridge, Tasmania, Australia) 2nd to 3rd October 2010.

Two Day Workshop – In Pursuit of Complex Cloth (Day Two)
”Stitching and Beyond” Textile Group (Woodbridge, Tasmania, Australia) 2nd to 3rd October 2010.

Advance Silk Screen Printing
Redcliffe City Art Gallery Redcliffe, Queensland, Australia) 10th April 2011.

One Day Workshop - In Pursuit of Complex Cloth
The Victorian Feltmakers Inc. (Melbourne, Victoria, Australia) 14th May 2011.

One Day Workshop - In Pursuit of Complex Cloth (Felted and Silk Fibers)
Victorian Feltmakers Inc (Melbourne, Victoria, Australia) 15th May 2011.

Five Day Workshop – Disperse Dye and Transfer Printing
SDA (Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA) 13th to 17th June 2011.

Five Day Disperse Dye Master Class – Barbara Scott
Art Quill Studio (Arcadia Vale, NSW, Australia) 15th to 19th August 2011.

Five Day Workshop – Disperse Dye and Transfer Printing
Fiber Arts Australia (Sydney, NSW, Australia) 26th September to 1st October 2011.

One Day Workshop – Improvisational Screen Printing
Various classes within Australia.

Two Day Workshop – Disperse Dye and Transfer Printing
ATASDA (Sydney, NSW, Australia) 23rd to 24th June 2012.

MSDS Demonstration at Zijdelings
(Tilburg, The Netherlands) October, 2012.

Five Day Workshop - Disperse Dye and Transfer Printing
Fibre Arts@Ballarat (Ballarat, Victoria, Australia) 6th to 12th April 2013.

Two Day Workshop - Disperse Dye and Transfer Printing
EFTAG (Tuross Head, NSW, Australia) 13th to 14th April 2013.

Two Day Workshop - Disperse Dye and Transfer Printing
Zijdelings Studio (Tilburg, The Netherlands) 9th to 10th October 2014.

PCA - Celebrating 50 Years in 2016
Art Quill Studio 2016 Workshop Program (Newcastle, Australia).

Image Dreamings: Basic Silk Screen Printing Workshop - Part I
2016 Art Quill Studio Workshop Program (Newcastle, Australia).

Image Dreamings: Basic Silk Screen Printing Workshop - Part II
2016 Art Quill Studio Workshop Program (Newcastle, Australia).

In Pursuit of: Improvisational Screen Printing Workshop
2016 Art Quill Studio Workshop Program (Newcastle, Australia).

In Pursuit of: Low Relief Screen Printing (LRSP) Workshop
2016 Art Quill Studio Workshop Program (Newcastle, Australia).

Art Quill Studio 2017 Workshop Program
2017 Art Quill Studio Workshop Program (Newcastle, Australia).


Introduction: Improvisational Screen Printing
In “Improvisational Screen Printing” the printed image is not under complete artistic control as in traditional screen printing. It is an exciting, creative approach for the adventurous spirit, who loves serendipitous and spontaneous effects.

Improvisational screen printing techniques can include the use of every day materials like wax crayons, low relief texture items and fabric interfacing to create multi-faceted, rich and colorful layered imagery.

Improvisational screen printing includes the application of non-permanent, semi-permanent and permanent screen surface media. Non-permanent applications include wax crayons, low relief texture items and paper stencils. Semi-permanent applications include cold wax, soy wax, and Ezy Cut stencils. Permanent applications include photo emulsion, acrylic paint and spray paint media. Both fabric paints and fabric dyes can be used with all of the above applications of screen surface media.


Newcastle Printmakers Workshop Inc.
This workshop was organized by Vale Vincent from the Newcastle Printmakers Workshop Inc., Adamstown, Newcastle, Australia. It was held at Studio 48 Art Gallery in New Lambton, Newcastle, Australia on the 5th November 2011.

For those who live in Newcastle (Australia) the annual mini-print exhibition by members of the Newcastle Printmakers Workshop - "SURFACE" - can be currently viewed at Back to Back Galleries (57 Bull St, Cooks Hill, Newcastle, Australia). The works feature a broad range of printmaking techniques including linocut, silkscreen, etching, drypoint, collagraph and monotype. The prints are accompanied by ceramic works decorated using printmaking techniques. All work in this fabulous collection is both collectable and affordable. The exhibition is on from November 11th to the 27th, 2011 and is open Friday, Saturday and Sunday between 11am to 5pm.

For further information about this non-profit making organisation visit:
Newcastle Printmakers Workshop Inc


One-Day Workshop Synopsis
This was a one-day introductory “Improvisational Screen Printing” workshop, where participants learnt to use the silkscreen in a non-traditional, exciting, improvisational manner. Using everyday easily accessible materials like water-soluble crayons and wax, temporary and semi-permanent image creation techniques were explored using the silkscreen on fabric. The course delved into inspiring color and design combinations and included multi-layered patterning and texture techniques.

The People
Maureen Cafe, Jan Downes, Gay McDonell, Jacqueline Nash-Brummell and Patricia Williamsz attended the workshop.

Group Photo.
From left to right: Jacqueline Nash-Brummell, Patricia Williamsz, Jan Downes, Maureen Cafe and Gay McDonell surrounded by Studio 48 Art Gallery’s lush garden.

Sandra Baker (center), owner and founder of Studio 48 Art Gallery, looks on as Jan Downes (left) and Patricia Williamsz (right) work on their printed fabrics.


The Exciting Output
Below are some of the outputs of the participants printed works that were created during the workshop.

Maureen (a) Silkscreen print using water-soluble crayons.

Maureen (b) Silkscreen prints using water-soluble crayons on a multi-hue printed background.

Maureen (c) Silkscreen prints using cold wax imagery and water-soluble crayons on a multi-hue printed background.

Jan (a) Silkscreen prints using color, value and texture to create a multi-hue printed surface.

Jan (b) Silkscreen prints using water soluble crayons on a multi-hue printed background.

Jan (c) Silkscreen prints using cold wax imagery on a multi-hue printed background.

Gay (a) Silkscreen prints using water-soluble crayons.

Gay (b) Silkscreen prints using color, value and texture to create a multi-hue printed surface.

Gay (c) Silkscreen prints using cold wax imagery and water-soluble crayons on a multi-hue printed background.

Jacqueline (a) Silkscreen print using water-soluble crayons on a multi-hue printed background.

Jacqueline (b) Silkscreen prints using cold wax imagery and water soluble crayons on a multi-hue printed background.

Jacqueline (c) Silkscreen print using rubber bands, color, value and texture to create an organic, multi-hue printed surface.

Patricia (a) Silkscreen print using water-soluble crayons.

Patricia (b) Silkscreen prints using water-soluble crayons (left corner) on a multi-hue printed background.

Patricia (c) Silkscreen prints using cold wax imagery on a multi-hue printed background.


Master Classes in Australia
For those who requested additional teaching information, I am available to tutor Master Classes with respect to the following printing/dyeing on fabric classes: "Melding Experiences: Master Class in Disperse Dyes And Sublimation Printing" and "Master Class In the Art Of Complex Cloth". Personal one to one instruction is also available for my "Low Relief Screen Printing" (LRSP), "Improvisational Screen Printing" and other print based techniques. For further details please email: studio

Saturday, November 5, 2011

ArtCloth Dyptich:
The Making of the “Separation of Life”
ArtCloth Practice

Marie-Therese Wisniowski

Introduction
Tiselius won the Nobel Prize in 1948 for separating proteins and polynucleotides using electrophoresis. It separates their charged form, due to their differential migration rates in an electric field. My ArtCloth dyptich reflects on the “Separation of Life” using an imaginary separation process.

The Making of “The Separation of Life”
Before I can create a work of art, whether on paper or on cloth, I need to be passionately moved by what I am about to create.

The concept underlying “The Separation of Life” evolved from a dinner table conversation I had with my husband one evening. He is a Professor of Physical Chemistry doing research on biomedical processes. I asked him what he had done at work this particular day and in his usual fashion he said, “Oh not much,” and then added in a bemused fashion, “Today, we separated some proteins associated with stress”.

“So”, I said, “You separated a building block necessary for a process in life.”

He replied, “I don’t think I would have put it as dramatically as that.”

Over the next few days a concept grew in my mind. These scientists were now so firmly rooted in an abstracted world that the wonderment of their work was becoming lost in the humdrum of everyday activity. What if one day the very essence of human life itself could be separated by scientific means? That is, the drivers of life such as DNA, RNA and proteins can already be separated, but what if the life force itself could be separated? What would the separation look like?

Whenever I have a project, I do intensive research. In this case I must have spent 100 hours researching the topic. Hence, extracting information from my husband and elsewhere - at those headland points one reaches - I discovered that Tiselius won the Nobel Prize in 1948 for separating proteins and polynucleotides (DNA or RNA) using electrophoresis. I was determined that my ArtCloth piece would reflect on the separation of the essence of life.

This is what my husband would see. The staining of the proteins yields colors of blue or grey or reddish brown. The trails that these proteins leave are globular in shape. In some cases it appears as knots on a fiber length.

When I create some of my ArtCloth pieces I appropriate imagery, but in doing so I turn it in my mind so as to re-create a totally different feel; that is, with intent I change the act of engagement. For the "Separation of Life", my imagery will be loosely based on the electrophoresis image, but it will be so significantly altered that the interaction with the viewer will become a totally different art experience.


The Separation of Life - An Artistic Concept
The colors I employed for the ArtCloth dyptich needed to convey a subtle, ethereal quality. I used Procion MX Dyes because they are color-fast, and light-fast; that is, the dye molecules bond securely to the fiber polymer system (albeit cotton, silk or rayon). They are also suited to a dyebath, printing or hand painting techniques. Moreover, these colors are intermixable and so provide a large array of hues that yield consistent and controllable results.

I was working on a dyptich which I shall label A and B.

Dyptich Component A
ArtCloth A was dyed, and then over-dyed using the following shibori techniques:
(i) The fabric was folded in half and folded over in half again.
(ii) The ArtCloth piece was then folded horizontally in halves until it formed a thin strip.
(iii) Small clamps were positioned on the fabric to act as a resist and to hold and tie the fabric in place whilst in the bath. The clamps were also positioned to create the desired effect that was envisaged to imprint on the surface layers.
(iv) The still-clamped fabric was then placed in its fourth and final navy immersion dyebath to add surface richness to the final layer.

Dyptich Component B
ArtCloth B was dyed and then over-dyed using the following shibori techniques:
(i) The fabric was folded in half and folded over in half again to form a square.
(ii) The ArtCloth piece was then folded horizontally in halves until it formed a thin strip.
(iii) The strip was rolled and elastic bands were positioned on the fabric to act as a resist and to hold and tie the fabric in place whilst in the bath. The elastic bands were also positioned to create the desired effect that was envisaged to imprint on the surface layers.
(iv) The still-tied fabric was then placed in its fourth and final navy immersion dyebath to add surface richness to the final layer.

The two ArtCloth pieces were clamped and discharged with discharge paste to create subtle shapes that have been created in each piece.


My Approach to Art Making
Whilst I do a large amount of research prior to creating any artwork, on the day of creation I leave my mind outside of the Art Quill Studio and do all the artwork intuitvely. The research is now a part of each act of my art mark making. In other words, I do it in an unself-conscious manner as if I was a complete stranger to it and so I leave my unconscious thoughts free to roam all over the cloth.

The Zen Masters, as outlined by D.T. Suzuki, felt that:
”Man is a thinking reed, but his great works are done when he is not calculating or thinking”.


Finished Artwork

Dyptich A: “Separation of Life” - full view.

Dyptich A: “Separation of Life” – detailed view.

Dyptich B: “Separation of Life” - full view.

Dyptich B: “Separation of Life” – detailed view.


Postscript
Both ArtCloth pieces were framed in mat plexiglass frames - to hang side-by-side as a dyptich. After it was exhibited in ‘New Frontiers: an exhibition of contemporary fibre art’ @ the ArtHouse, McAllen, Texas, USA, both were sold to a private collector in the USA.