Saturday, February 25, 2012

Deconstructed & Polychromatic Screen Printing Introductory Course
(ArtCloth Workshop)

Tutor: Marie-Therese Wisniowski

Preamble
This blogspot exhibits many of my students outputs from a variety of workshops. There are one, two and five day workshops as well as workshops that have a different focus. Nevertheless, it always surprises me how much I learn from my students and how enthusiastic they are to learn and so for your convenience, I have listed the workshop posts below.

The University of Newcastle Multi-Media Course
The University of Newcastle (Newcastle and Ourimbah Campuses, NSW, Australia) 2008 to 2010.

One and Two Day Disperse Dye Workshops
Various Textile Groups (Australia) 2008 - 2011.

Five Day Workshop - In Pursuit of Complex Cloth
“Wrapt in Rocky” Textile Fibre Forum Conference (Rockhampton, Queensland, Australia) 29th June to 5th July 2008.

Five Day Workshop – In Pursuit of Complex Cloth
Orange Textile Fiber Forum (Orange, NSW, Australia) 19th to 25th April 2009.

5 Day Workshop – In Pursuit of Complex Cloth
Beautiful Silks (Melbourne, Victoria, Australia) 20th to 21st March 2010.

Five Day Workshop – Disperse Dye and Transfer Printing
“Wrapt in Rocky” Biennial Textile Forum/Conference Program (Rockhampton, Queensland, Australia) 25th June to 1st July 2010.

Two Day Workshop – Improvisational Screen Printing
ATASDA (Sydney, NSW, Australia) 28th to 29th August 2010.

Two Day Workshop – In Pursuit of Complex Cloth (Day One)
”Stitching and Beyond” Textile Group (Woodbridge, Tasmania, Australia) 2nd to 3rd October 2010.

Two Day Workshop – In Pursuit of Complex Cloth (Day Two)
”Stitching and Beyond” Textile Group (Woodbridge, Tasmania, Australia) 2nd to 3rd October 2010.

Advance Silk Screen Printing
Redcliffe City Art Gallery Redcliffe, Queensland, Australia) 10th April 2011.

One Day Workshop - In Pursuit of Complex Cloth
The Victorian Feltmakers Inc. (Melbourne, Victoria, Australia) 14th May 2011.

One Day Workshop - In Pursuit of Complex Cloth (Felted and Silk Fibers)
Victorian Feltmakers Inc (Melbourne, Victoria, Australia) 15th May 2011.

Five Day Workshop – Disperse Dye and Transfer Printing
SDA (Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA) 13th to 17th June 2011.

Five Day Disperse Dye Master Class – Barbara Scott
Art Quill Studio (Arcadia Vale, NSW, Australia) 15th to 19th August 2011.

Five Day Workshop – Disperse Dye and Transfer Printing
Fiber Arts Australia (Sydney, NSW, Australia) 26th September to 1st October 2011.

One Day Workshop – Improvisational Screen Printing
Newcastle Printmakers Workshop Inc. (Newcastle, NSW, Australia) 5th November 2011.

One Day Workshops – Low Relief Screen-Printing
Various classes within Australia.

Two Day Workshop – Disperse Dye and Transfer Printing
ATASDA (Sydney, NSW, Australia) 23rd to 24th June 2012.

MSDS Demonstration at Zijdelings
(Tilburg, The Netherlands) October, 2012.

Five Day Workshop - Disperse Dye and Transfer Printing
Fibre Arts@Ballarat (Ballarat, Victoria, Australia) 6th to 12th April 2013.

Two Day Workshop - Disperse Dye and Transfer Printing
EFTAG (Tuross Head, NSW, Australia) 13th to 14th April 2013.

Two Day Workshop - Disperse Dye and Transfer Printing
Zijdelings Studio (Tilburg, The Netherlands) 9th to 10th October 2014.

PCA - Celebrating 50 Years in 2016
Art Quill Studio 2016 Workshop Program (Newcastle, Australia).

Image Dreamings: Basic Silk Screen Printing Workshop - Part I
2016 Art Quill Studio Workshop Program (Newcastle, Australia).

Image Dreamings: Basic Silk Screen Printing Workshop - Part II
2016 Art Quill Studio Workshop Program (Newcastle, Australia).

In Pursuit of: Improvisational Screen Printing Workshop
2016 Art Quill Studio Workshop Program (Newcastle, Australia).

In Pursuit of: Low Relief Screen Printing (LRSP) Workshop
2016 Art Quill Studio Workshop Program (Newcastle, Australia)

Art Quill Studio 2017 Workshop Program
2017 Art Quill Studio Workshop Program (Newcastle, Australia).

In Pursuit of: Low Relief Screen Printing (LRSP)
2017 Art Quill Studio Workshop Program (Newcastle, Australia).


Introduction
Using fewer steps than traditional screen printing, deconstructed and polychromatic screen printing offers the beginner as well as the experienced artist the same flexibility and spontaneity as paint to fabric or paper, with the added result of more than one image.

Polychromatic Printing (PP) is a combination of water color painting and screen printing developed by Joy Stocksdale. By painting directly onto a silk screen with concentrated dyes, the artist can achieve multi colored images, which can be printed on fabric or paper. Using release paste, one pull of the squeegee releases the dyes onto the substrate surface. A series of multiple prints can be obtained, which results in a limited edition of mono style prints with each print becoming a paler rendition of the prior print.

Known for her innovative approaches to dyeing and screen printing processes, Kerr Grabowski developed Deconstructed Screen Printing (DSP), a printing/monoprint technique, which allows for a freer, more painterly approach to screen printing. Printing with thickened dyes over low relief textured surfaces the dye is allowed to dry in the silk screen then printed onto fabric using release paste. The paste gradually dissolves the dried dye, which results in the image “deconstructing” as successive prints are created. No two prints are ever the same and the resultant distressed and disintegrating prints are rich in color, texture and pattern.

Claire Benn and Lesley Morgan have developed Breakdown Printing (BP). Similar to DSP, it varies in that much thicker quantities of dye are layered onto the back of the silk screen. Both low relief and heavily embossed textures can be impressed into the wet dye and left in the screen to dry.

All these techniques can be used individually or combined to create a rich array of complex color, marks, textures and layered imagery. The resulting fabric may be used as an individual work or a point of departure for further embellishment.


Two Day Workshop Synopsis
This workshop was organized by Marion Hera-Gorr of Beautiful Silks. It was held at Beautiful Silks at 101 Victoria Street, Fitzroy in Melbourne, Victoria from the 20th - 21stMarch 2010.

Participants - who attended this fun and exciting workshop - were Alison Durham, Alison Withers, Gayle Gissing, Jeanette Wilkinson, Madeleine Zegir, Marea McGuire, Rhonda Nadasdy, Robyn Faris, Ruth Zegir, and Sherrie T Jewson.

In this two day workshop titled, “In Pursuit of ArtCloth: Deconstructed & Polychromatic Screen Printing Introductory Course”, participants learnt to create texture and imagery using the resist properties of dried thickened dye on a silk screen creating successive deconstructed organic prints. In unison with deconstructed screen printing (DSP) they investigated the painterly and spontaneous imaging created using polychromatic printing (PP) techniques. As well as the DSP and PP techniques, they also explored and worked on a “breakdown” printed series of images creating lush colors and exciting textures.


Student's Workshop ArtCloths

Alison Withers: Deconstructed and polychromatic screen printing study.

Alison Withers: Breakdown screen printing study.

Alison Withers: Breakdown screen printing study.

Alison Durham: Breakdown and polychromatic screen printing study.

Alison Durham: Breakdown screen printing study.

Madeleine Zegir: Deconstructed screen printing study.

Madeleine Zegir: Breakdown screen printing study.

Madeleine Zegir: Deconstructed and riso (thermofax) screen printing study.

Gayle Gissing: Deconstructed screen printing study.

Jeanette Wilkinson: Deconstructed screen printing study.

Jeanette Wilkinson: Deconstructed and riso (thermofax) screen printing study.

Marea McGuire: Polychromatic screen printing study.

Rhonda Nadasdy: Breakdown screen printing study.

Rhonda Nadasdy: Breakdown and polychromatic screen printing study.

Ruth Zegir: Breakdown screen printing study.

Ruth Zegir: Breakdown and polychromatic screen printing study.

Ruth Zegir: Deconstructed screen printing study.

Robyn Faris: Deconstructed and riso (thermofax) screen printing study.

Sherrie T Jewson: Deconstructed screen printing study.

Sherrie T Jewson: Deconstructed screen printing study.

Sherrie T Jewson: Deconstructed and riso (thermofax) screen printing study.

Saturday, February 18, 2012

Information Overload?
Opinion Piece on Art

Marie-Therese Wisniowski

Preamble
For your convenience I have listed other posts on this blogspot that focuses on writing about your own or others artworks:
Writing About Art (Part I)
Writing About Art (Part II)


Information Overload
The right side of the brain is often associated with emotion and creativity, whereas the left side of the brain is associated with language[1]. Nonetheless, latest research on the brain's plasticity shows that these divisions may be too simplistic: different parts of the brain in the different hemispheres will coordinate in order to complete a function, since most functions are multi-faceted.

It is not scientifically true that if you are artistic, you are basically trapped in the right hemisphere of your brain and thus you are hopeless in articulating your artistic ideas because of your under developed (neuronal speaking) left side of the brain. It has been postulated that if you cannot do maths you tend to study humanities and if you cannot articulate your feelings you tend to deal with images. These hypotheses have never been scientifically tested - they are therefore unsubstantiated notions.

Marie-Therese Wisniowski, Discrimination IV: I am Human (2005).
Medium: Archival Inkjet Print on Paper.
Size: A3.

My university students, when confronted with writing an essay about art, are always quick to point to such myths. When they do, I am quick to point to one of my favourite books – “Writing About Art” by Henry M. Sayre[2]. I also give my students a comprehensive list of art-bloggers who can easily publish lucid conversational essays about their own art, unravelling techniques, and ideas and giving valuable insights into their art practice. They readily use their right and left side of brain interchangeably, imperceptibly and instantaneously.

Cover of H.M. Sayre’s Book – Pablo Picasso, Woman With Book, Oil Painting (1932).

Artists such as Piet Mondrian (e.g. Painting I, 1926) and Jackson Pollack (Number 1 1948, 1948) have deliberately labelled some of their artworks with titles that were devoid of any subject matter. In Pollack’s case he wanted the “doing” of the painting and the outcome of its “doing” to stand paramount during the act of engagement and so not to be obscured or distracted by a title, which may mislead or obviate the central purpose of the act – to “experience” the work unfettered[2]. Some of the ArtCloth titles on this blog have been deliberately named - “Untitled” - perhaps for similar reasons (see earlier posts).

Piet Mondrian, Painting I, Oil Painting (1926).

All artworks generate their own mien – some are modified by the ambience in which they reside, whereas others distort or even warp the environment that they are located in by their mere presence. As a curator, I am always aware of how the artwork interacted with the space allocated to it and its surrounds (see Engaging New Visions on this blog site). As an artist, I am aware about how my artwork should be presented, even though in “group” exhibitions I may not have a say about its surrounds.

Jackson Pollack, Number 1 1948, Oil Painting (1948).

My trait is that all of my artworks are titled - and I choose my titles very carefully - to inform the viewer of the subject matter of the artworks; that is, my title is a just another clue. However, rarely can it capture the “experience” generated by the work, because often such intricate interactions are somewhat plastic, varying with each viewer’s interpretation and my over-arching intent as an artist - to create an “experience” during the act of engagement. As I have often stated on this blog site, art is an ill defined communication system, albeit intentional by design; it cannot be precise; it is therefore vague in delivery and so may surprisingly generate unexpected constructive or destructive criticisms and/or analysis. See the following blog for some unexpected comments by art critics.

Why ArtCloth

When I exhibit my artwork, I make sure it is properly labelled (Name, Title, Year It was Created, Medium, Size etc.) and depending on the curator, I would normally follow this label with a brief description of my “intent” in creating my artwork; that is, the intended “experience” that I wanted to create during the act of engagement. The latter is usually less than 100 words in length. Nevertheless, I have participated in exhibitions where such statements were shunned. In a solo exhibition, I always leave a pamphlet giving a readable bibliography and shortened version of my curriculum vitae. Hopefully, most of the above material will be in a catalogue, together with reproductions of my artwork. All of these informative tools are mere aids to assist in understanding my artwork. For example, below is the sort of information I would deliver with an exhibited artwork, albeit that is much longer than what I would normally pen.

Marie-Therese Wisniowski, Whose Church? (2006).
Technique: Fine-Art print on paper employing the author's "multiplex" silkscreen printing technique.
Size: A3.


Synopsis Of ArtWork: Whose Church?
As the Catholic Church grew from a seed into a worldwide conglomerate, the Vatican amassed enormous protected material wealth. It did so via capitalism. Even today, it operates its business ventures outside of the constructs of the Church on capitalistic grounds. In 1973, a Peruvian Jesuit Father Gustavo Gutierrez published a book entitled “A Theology of Liberation”. The tenets of what became known as liberation theology rested on freeing the people from political oppression, economic want and misery here on earth. More specifically still, it was freeing the people in Latin America from political domination by capitalism. The underlying assumption was the preferential option that Jesus showed for the poor. Was it not easy for a camel to slip through the tiny eye of a needle than for a rich man to get into heaven? After all, was not Christ himself poor – “…the Son of Man has nowhere to lay his head, while even the birds of the air have nests and the foxes have their lairs”.

This print juxtaposes the material wealth of the Church derived from capitalism with its spiritual wealth (e.g. Saint Francis of Assisi and the cross of Jesus) and so directly raises the dichotomy, which challenged the liberation theologians – Whose Church?


Information Overload?
So where is the mystery in this print if all information about it has been delivered to the viewer? When I created – “Whose Church?” – my intention was to artistically investigate the dichotomy between theory and practice of the Roman Catholic Church. Using deductive reasoning, I settled on a particular theme (e.g. liberation theology) to give my work a compositional uniformity. For a viewer, the unfettered individual “experience” during the act of engagement may have settled on more recent problems of the Church, namely, the sexual abuse by Priests of minors and so the "experience" might have been framed in terms of – Is it the Church of Jesus, or is the Church permanently anchored to the human frailties of its minders - the priests and nuns? (Inductive reasoning). The artist statement informs rather than captures or contextualises the entire array of possible unfettered “experience(s)” felt by the viewer(s).

I should point out that reproductions in a catalogue or on your computer screen do not slavishly follow the color of the artworks, nor do they give you a feel for their size, complexity or yield information about the art marks (fine, rough, smooth or textured etc.) Hence, care must always be taken to “see” the work in situ (if possible) before writing about it.

Replica of the Mona Lisa recently discovered at the Madrid's Museo del Prado. Conservators say that it was painted at the same time as the original — and possibly by one of the master's pupils, or perhaps even by a lover.

Lastly, I never describe formal elements in my work such as lines, space, shape, light and dark, color, rhythm, repetition, proportion, balance, scale, unity, values, variety or more unique elements such as the use of foils, gold leaf etc. or even make comparative studies [2] I might do so when I am delivering a talk about my artwork to an audience, where I may wish to expand on technical aspects that underwrote the intended “experience” and moreover, place in context my artwork in terms of my overall output, my influences and the artwork of others. Generally, I leave these topics to the critics, who may wish to write about my art. After all, there needs to be some mists in what I do!


References:
[1] Smith, Carol. "Brain Tumor Opens Her Mind To Art", The Seattle Post-Intelligencer,March 13, (2006).

[2] Sayre, Henry M.,“Writing About Art”, Prentice Hall, New Jersey, (1995) ISBN 0-12-124975-4.

Saturday, February 11, 2012

ArtCloth from Utopia
Australian Aboriginal ArtCloth

Marie-Therese Wisniowski

Introduction
When I read Sir Thomas More's (also known as Saint Thomas More) – Utopia – in the 1960s, I felt he strove for the intersection between fact and fantasy (that later became the hallmark of science fiction writers and more recently of espionage writers such as Frederick Forsyth). More’s Utopia tried to reform the human spirit in an age and place where religiosity was driven towards the mundane (e.g. Henry VIII dumped the Roman Catholic Church in order to divorce Catherine of Aragon, and More in 1535 refusing to take an oath impugning the pope’s authority was then beheaded).

Illustration For The 1516 First Edition Of Utopia.

An area that is 230 kilometers North-East of Alice Springs (Australia) is also called Utopia. The area was named Utopia by early pastoralists in the 1920s since rabbits there were so numerous and tame that they could be caught by hand. Utopia's Indigenous place names — Alhalpere, Rreltye, Thelye, Atarrkete and Ingutanka — are also the particular names of families who are custodians for these aboriginal “counties”. There are approximately 880 to 1000 people who live in some 16 small camps dotted across an area of 2000 square kilometers. The community is structured on extended family groups whose camps are generally centered on their clan lands. There are about 120 working artists in the community.

Geographical position of the Utopia region (Australia).

In 2007 the then Australian Prime Minister, John Howard, in response to child sexual abuse and neglect of Northern Territorial Aboriginals, legislated in law - The Northern Territory National Emergency Response (also referred to as "the intervention"). The response has been severely criticized by aboriginal and non-aboriginal groups but has received bipartisan parliamentary support. The current Prime Minister, Julia Gillard continues to support the response, though her predecessor, Kevin Rudd, did make some adjustments to its implementation.

The Intervention.
Note: Utopia has no high-speed internet connectivity. Internet Pornography Statistics
Pornographic websites 4.2 million (12% of total websites)
Pornographic pages 420 million
Daily pornographic search engine requests 68 million (25% of total search engine requests)
Daily pornographic emails 2.5 billion (8% of total emails)
Internet users who view porn 42.7%
Received unwanted exposure to sexual material 34%
Average daily pornographic emails/user 4.5 per Internet user
Monthly Pornographic downloads (Peer-to-peer) 1.5 billion (35% of all downloads).

One of the measures that the current government agencies are actively pursuing is to remove these disperse camps and settlements into a more concentrated “village” society, where resources (such as health, education, social services etc.) can be more easily administrated and delivered. The “Utopian” aboriginals are currently resisting this move, since they consider their immediate connection to their land and its intimate features are more spiritually important than a “white” notion of a village society.

Northern Territory Intervention Word Cloud.
Google - Voices Against The Intervention

No matter what the reason behind Utopia's original naming, it was nevertheless aptly named; the aboriginal artists spread throughout this region are undergoing a reaffirmation of their kindred spirit via their new found art media and in doing so, they are (in keeping with More's vision) arriving at the intersection of their earthly/geographical reality and their non-earthly/indigenous spirituality.


Utopian Aboriginal ArtCloth
Utopia was the name of a pastoral lease taken out on the area in 1927. This lease resulted in the traditional areas being depopulated as local aboriginal people moved to homestead encampments to find work. In 1977, the Aboriginal Land Fund Commission acquired the lease on behalf of the Utopia community and in 1979 the land was returned to them under inalienable freehold title.

In 1977 a batik program was started in Utopia as a source of income for the women. The majority of the artists creating these batik designs were women painting Dreamtime stories of bush tucker and women’s ceremonies. In the preparation for the land claim this direct connection between art and land helped to provide the supportive evidence needed for the Utopia community to lodge their successful land-rights claim. Throughout the hearings the women of Utopia displayed their batiks to demonstrate the economic viability of the outstations, and also as an expression of their Dreaming rights and responsibilities to the country.

The National Gallery of Victoria has the largest collection of Aboriginal ArtCloth in Australia. Below are examples of the Batik ArtCloth of the women artists of Utopia.

Violet Petyarr, Mountain Devil Lizard Dreaming (1997).
Technique: Batik on silk.
Size: 115 cm (width) x 203 cm (length).
Courtesy of reference[1].

Emily Kngwarray, Kam (Pencil Yam Seed) (1988).
Technique: Batik on silk.
Size: 116.9 cm (width) x 191.3 cm (length).
Courtesy of reference[1].

Ada Bird Petyarr, Bean Tree Dreaming (1991).
Technique: Batik on silk.
Size: 91.5 cm (width) x 187 cm (length).
Courtesy of reference[1].

Abbie Loy, Bush Hen Dreaming (1997).
Technique: Batik on silk.
Size: 115 cm (width) x 210 cm (length).
Courtesy of reference[1].

Emily Kam Kngwarray, Anwerlarr (Pencil Yam) (1980).
Technique: Batik on silk.
Size: 84.2 cm (width) x 270.5 cm (length).
Courtesy of reference[2].

Lena Pwerl, Arlewatyerr (Goanna) (1980-82).
Technique: Batik on silk.
Size: 91.2 cm (width) x 230.5 cm (length).
Courtesy of reference[2].

Gloria Ngal, Road Map, Utopia (1989).
Technique: Batik on silk.
Size: 110 cm (width) x 234 cm (length).
Courtesy of reference[2].

Annie Petyarr, Camp Scene (1989).
Technique: Batik on silk.
Size: 110 cm (width) x 230 cm (length).
Courtesy of reference[2].

Ada Bird Petyarr, Inernt (Bean Tree) Dreaming (1991).
Technique: Batik on silk.
Size: 91.5 cm (width) x 187 cm (length).
Courtesy of reference[2].

Ada Bird Petyarr, Arnkerrth Then Ngangkar (Mountain Devil Lizard And Traditional Healer) (1991).
Technique: Batik on silk.
Size: 93 cm (width) x 181 cm (length).
Courtesy of reference[2].


Reference:
[1] J. Ryan and R. Healy, Raiki Wara, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne (1998).

[2] J. Ryan et al., Across The Desert – Aboriginal Batik from Central Australia, Council of Trustees of the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne (2008).

Saturday, February 4, 2012

A Selection of My Scarves
Wearable Art

Marie-Therese Wisniowski

Preamble
On this blog spot there are posts that center on my “Wearable Art” (e.g. scarves, digital or analogue created fabric lengths etc.) For your convenience I have listed these posts below.

Leaves Transformed: A New Collection of My Digitally Designed Fabrics
My New Silk Rayon Velvet Scarves@Purple Noon Art And Sculpture Gallery
My Fabric Lengths@QSDS
My Fabric Collection:"Oh, Oh Marilyn and Mona!"@Spoonflower
2013 Australian Craft Awards – Finalist
My Scarves@2014 Scarf Festival: "Urban Artscape" Pashminas
My New Scarves and Fabric Lengths
New Range of Silk Neckties - Karma and Akash
AIVA: My New Hand Dyed and Hand Printed Fabric Design
New Colorways For My 'Cultural Graffiti' Fabrics
Byzantine Glow: A New Collection of My Digitally Designed Fabrics
Wall Flower: A New Collection of My Digitally Designed Fabrics
Ink Fern: A New Collection of My Digitally Designed Fabrics
Celebratory Fireworks


Introduction
There are three basic ingredients (as opposed to definitions) that all artworks possess; (i) they need to be “engaged”; (ii) they are non-functional, and (iii) they are aesthetic. Wearable Art is “Art” when placed in an art context but when it is not placed in an art context, its functionality obscures the act of engagement. My scarves are wearable art.

My scarves have been created using a range of fabrics and various hand dyeing and hand printing techniques. They are a one-off creation, never to be repeated in color, tone or overall design. However, some of the design elements may re-appear in other scarves, but the overall colors and design is what ensures their uniqueness.

What I do not do is sew, even though my mother (Milla Wisniowski) created fashion-wear for the Melbourne (Australia) fashion industry. I figured that one sewer/designer of clothes in the family was more than enough. I have her to thank for all the scarves that required stitching (see below).

My scarves are available in various galleries, art and craft outlets throughout Australia. For example, in the Hunter Valley Vineyards (Australia) they are available from Butterflies Gallery.


A Selection Of My Scarves

ArtCloth Pashmina Scarf 1.
Techniques: Hand dyed and hand printed by Marie-Therese Wisniowski.
Multi-dyed, block printed and stenciled employing dyes and pigment on viscose blend.
Size: 74 cm (width) x 195 cm (length).

ArtCloth Pashmina Scarf 2.
Techniques: Hand dyed and hand printed by Marie-Therese Wisniowski.
Multi-dyed, block printed and stenciled empolying dyes and pigment on viscose blend.
Size: 74 cm (width) x 195 cm (length).

ArtCloth Pashmina Scarf 3.
Techniques: Hand dyed and hand printed by Marie-Therese Wisniowski.
Dyed, over-dyed, silkscreened and foiled employing dyes, pigment and foil on viscose blend.
Size: 74 cm (width) x 195 cm (length).

ArtCloth Pashmina Scarf 4.
Techniques: Hand dyed and hand printed by Marie-Therese Wisniowski.
Silk screened, discharged and foiled employing dyes and foil on viscose blend.
Size: 74 cm (width) x 195 cm (length).

ArtCloth Pashmina Scarf 5.
Techniques: Hand dyed and hand printed by Marie-Therese Wisniowski.
Silk screened and foiled employing dyes and foil on viscose blend.
Size: 74 cm (width) x 195 cm (length).

ArtCloth Pashmina Scarf 6.
Techniques: Hand dyed and hand printed by Marie-Therese Wisniowski.
Shibori multi dyed, block printed and silkscreened employing dyes and pigment on viscose blend.
Size: 74 cm (width) x 195 cm (length).

Velvet ArtCloth Scarf (Detail View).
Techniques: Hand dyed and hand printed by Marie-Therese Wisniowski.
Dyed, over-dyed, discharged, silk screened and foiled on silk rayon velvet.
Size: 27 cm (width) x 180 cm (length).