Saturday, October 23, 2021

The Creation of ‘Whose Place? My Place, Your Space’
Fine-Art Print on Paper

Marie-Therese Wisniowski

Preamble
This blogspot is not only devoted to ArtCloth and all things fabric (e.g. wearables) but also to limited edition prints on paper and artists' printmakers books. I have listed below for your convenience my contribution to this artistic genre.
Made to Order
Unique State (Partners in Print)
Wangi's Djiran:"Unique State" Prints
Veiled Curtains
A Letter to a Friend
Beyond the Fear of Freedom
Travelling Solander Project
Star Series
Imprint
Cry for the Wilderness
Federation on Hold – Call Waiting
Wish You Were Where?
The Four Seasons
The Creation of Hurricane Katrina – The Disruptor


Introduction
Early in 2021, members of the Newcastle Printmakers Workshop (NPW) were invited to participate in an exhibition titled, ‘Locus,’ by Belinda Hungerford, Exhibitions & Curatorial Manager at New England Regional Art Gallery (NERAM) in Armidale, NSW. Along with 24 participants from the NPW, members from three other print collectives – Black Gully Printmakers (Armidale), Print Circle (Sydney) and the Southern Highlands Printmakers - were also invited.

The ‘Locus’ exhibition will be exhibited from Friday 5th November 2021 until Sunday 30th January 2022, with the official exhibition opening on Friday 5th November. Artist talks will take place on the morning of Saturday 6th November 2021.
Note: See the gallery’s website for additional information - https://www.neram.com.au. My thanks to NPW member Sally Picker who liaised with NERAM and co-ordinated the NPW’s contribution to the exhibition.


Exhibition Theme and Specifications
Artists often respond to what is around them and the notion of ‘place’ can have significant and varying meanings and impact within their work. Recently, where we live, work and sleep has become even more important due to the Covid lockdowns.

This exhibition explores the different meanings of place to each artist. What has kept you sane, or conversely, driven you to frustration? Where has been your place of respite and comfort? What has centred you during this time of lockdown upheaval?

As each collective is based in four geographically different locations it is hoped the works will be diverse and express a range of responses to the theme. The works could be as broad or specific as the artist desired. The size of the prints were fixed, namely, 38 x 28 cm @ portrait orientation. Tabs were required to be attached since the artworks could be pinned to the gallery walls. The prints needed to be limited edition, namely a minimum of one print for exhibition/sale as well as optional prints - one for sale in the gallery shop, and a print for donation to NERAM.


Final Print: ‘Whose Place? My Place, Your Space’


Technique and Media: Silkscreened, stencilled, stamped and mono printed employing glazes, transparent and opaque pigments on Stonehenge stock.

Artist Statement: COVID-19 is a coronavirus disease which causes severe acute respiratory syndrome from being infected with the coronavirus 2 (namely, SARS-CoV-2). Due to the infectious nature of the Delta strain, state and region-wide lockdowns have been put in place to retard its progress through the community, thereby saving lives as well as reducing long-term medical effects because of its transmission. Lockdowns have enforced a conscious awareness of place as well as space. My print – ‘Whose Place? My Place, Your Space’ – features multilayered images, with the hint of a home in the background, and with a multilayered foreground of flora/fauna images unaffected by the COVID outbreak unlike those hidden in their home.

Research and Processes Involved in the Creation of the Print
Before I start on any print project my golden rule is to do an extensive amount of research on the topic.

Research on ‘Whose Place? My Place, Your Space’ was easily gleaned via multiple sources on news services, the internet, and documentaries. Whilst researching my information, I also focused on what media and design I should employ. That is, a synergic relationship between information gained from research and the form or design of the print that works for me.

Numerous images were sourced and/or sketched that concentrated on various visual associations with lockdowns due to the Delta strain of Covid 19 which enforced a conscious awareness of place as well as space. Printmaking tools were then created employing the numerous images.

After creating three very different proofs/versions of prints containing various combinations of design elements, I finally settled on the third proof/version. This printed proof featured all of the design elements that I felt captured the visual aesthetic that I wanted to encapsulate in my print edition. The following images and text give you an insight into the processes that were employed to create my multi-layered print ‘Whose Place? My Place, Your Space’.


‘Whose Place? My Place, Your Space’
Steps And Layers Involved In Creating The Limited Edition Of Five Prints.
The following images and text give you an insight into the processes that were employed to create my multi-layered print ‘Whose Place? My Place, Your Space’.


The first series of printed images consisted of the following seven layers as can be seen in the above example:
1. An initial mono printed layer printed in a metallic black glaze as a textured background.
2. Screen printed images in mid metallic black of buildings representing people’s homes.
3. Screen printed image in yellow featuring a topographical landform map representing world-wide locations and communities affected by Covid 19 lockdowns.
4. Stenciled square window shapes overprinted in warm white representing people placed in hotel quarantine.
5. Stenciled abstract rectangle shapes overprinted in warm white to add depth to the images being overprinted.
6. Roller printed effects in warm white to soften the background buildings on the left side of the print.
7. Roller printed effects in warm white to soften the background buildings on the bottom of the print.


The second series of printed images consisted of the following overprinted five layers as can be seen in the above example:
8. Stamped rectangles in metallic black referencing barriers to restrict movement on roads and highways on the bottom of the print.
9. Overprinted roller effects in warm white and apricot to soften the heavy aesthetic of the barriers.
10. Screen printed images in orange referencing the urban/suburban environment.
11. Screen printed droplet images in warm white referencing the spread and highly transmissible nature of Covid-19.
12. Screen printed images in apricot referencing signage associated with Covid 19 restrictions.


The third and final series of printed images consisted of the following four overprinted layers as can be seen in the above image of the final print:
13. Stenciled square window shapes overprinted in orange representing people locked down in their apartments and homes.
14. to 16. Screen printed images of cascading branches and plants not affected by Covid 19 but offering relief to those in their homes via their local patch of nature to rest, reflect and restore their well-being.

I hope this gives you an insight in what I do as a printmaker in order to birth a final print from an imagined work. Hence, you can see for me it’s a dynamic rather than a static process. I hope you have enjoyed the insight into my printmaking process!